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These personality traits may predict cognitive decline later in life

Summary
People who are prone to mood swings and low emotional stability are more likely to experience cognitive decline later in life, a new study suggests.
4 months ago·Victoria, Canada

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CNN

Your personality can protect or age your brain, study finds

Certain personality traits are a key factor in whether people develop mild cognitive impairment later in life, according to a new study.

4 months ago·Atlanta, United States
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The Hill

These personality traits may predict cognitive decline later in life

Story at a glance For the study, researchers analyzed data from 1,954 participants in the Rush Memory and Aging Project. Participants agreed to annual assessments of their cognitive abilities follo…

4 months ago·Washington, United States
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KVIA

Your personality can protect or age your brain, study finds

By Sandee LaMotte, CNN Certain personality traits may be a key factor in whether people develop mild cognitive impairment later in life, a new study found. Being more conscientious and extroverted keeps mild cognitive impairment at bay longer, while having higher levels of neuroticism increases the chances of cognitive decline, according to a study published

4 months ago
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KIFI

Your personality can protect or age your brain, study finds - Local News 8

By Sandee LaMotte, CNNCertain personality traits may be a key factor in whether people develop mild cognitive impairment later in life, a new study found.Being more conscientious and extroverted keeps mild cognitive impairment at bay longer, while having higher levels of neuroticism increases the chances of cognitive decline, according to a study published Monday in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.“Personality traits reflect rel…

4 months ago
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Eurek Alert

Certain personality traits associated with cognitive functioning late in life

People who are organized, with high levels of self-discipline, may be less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment as they age, while people who are moody or emotionally unstable are more likely to experience cognitive decline late in life, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.

4 months ago·Washington, United States
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Science Daily

Certain personality traits associated with cognitive functioning late in life

People who are organized, with high levels of self-discipline, may be less likely to develop mild cognitive impairment as they age, while people who are moody or emotionally unstable are more likely to experience cognitive decline late in life, according to new research.

4 months ago·United States
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92% of the sources are Center
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WISH-TV
The Hill
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Eurek Alert
Science Daily
WHDH
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C 92%
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