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The first cave-bound mollusc species from the Americas

Summary by Ground News
A new species of cave-bound clam has been discovered in northern Brazil. Named Eupera troglobia, the mollusk demonstrates features characteristic for organisms not meant to see the daylight. The scientists highlight that their discovery is the latest reminder about how important the conservation of the fragile subterranean habitats is.
1 month ago

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The first cave-bound mollusc species from the Americas

Exclusively subterranean bivalves - the group of molluscs comprising clams, oysters, mussels, scallops - are considered a rarity. Prior to the present study, there had only been three such species confirmed in the world: all belonging to a small-sized mussel genus known from southeastern Europe. Against the odds, a new Brazilian study, published in the open-access scholarly journal Subterranean Biology, describes a new to science species of clea…

1 month ago·Washington, United States
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Phys.org

The first cave-bound mollusc species from the Americas

Exclusively subterranean bivalves—the group of molluscs comprising clams, oysters, mussels, scallops—are considered a rarity. Prior to the present study, there had only been three such species confirmed in the world: all belonging to a small-sized mussel genus known from southeastern Europe. Furthermore, bivalves are not your typical 'underworld' dweller, since they are almost immobile and do not tolerate environments low in oxygen.

1 month ago·United Kingdom
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The First Cave-Bound Mollusc Species From the Americas

Exclusively subterranean bivalves - the group of molluscs comprising clams, oysters, mussels, scallops - are considered a rarity.

1 month ago·Charlottesville, United States
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