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How plate tectonics, mountains and deep-sea sediments have maintained Earth's 'Goldilocks' climate

Summary by Ground News
Earth's climate has warmed and cooled with natural fluctuations in the level of carbon dioxide (CO�) in the atmosphere. Over the past century, humans have pushed CO� levels to their highest in 2 million years. New research shows how tectonic plates, volcanoes, eroding mountains and seabed sediment have controlled Earth's climate in the geological past. Harnessing these processes may play a part in maintaining the Goldilocks climate our planet has enjoyed.
1 month ago

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Raw Story

How plate tectonics, mountains and deep-sea sediments have maintained Earth’s ‘Goldilocks’ climate

For hundreds of millions of years, Earth’s climate has warmed and cooled with natural fluctuations in the level of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in the atmosphere. Over the past century, humans have pushed CO₂ levels to their highest in 2 million years – overtaking natural emissions – mostly by burning fossil fuels, causing ongoing global warming that may make parts of the globe uninhabitable.What can be done? As Earth scientists, we look to how natural …

1 month ago·United States
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Phys.org

How plate tectonics, mountains and deep-sea sediments have maintained Earth's 'Goldilocks' climate

For hundreds of millions of years, Earth's climate has warmed and cooled with natural fluctuations in the level of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in the atmosphere. Over the past century, humans have pushed CO₂ levels to their highest in 2 million years—overtaking natural emissions—mostly by burning fossil fuels, causing ongoing global warming that may make parts of the globe uninhabitable.

1 month ago·United Kingdom
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The Conversation

How plate tectonics, mountains and deep-sea sediments have maintained Earth's 'Goldilocks' climate

For hundreds of millions of years, Earth’s climate has warmed and cooled with natural fluctuations in the level of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in the atmosphere.

1 month ago·Melbourne, Australia
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