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'Safety in numbers' tactic keeps Pacific salmon safe from predators

Summary by Ground News
A new University of Washington study has found that Pacific salmon in larger groups have lower risk of being eaten by predators. For some salmon species, schooling comes at the cost of competition for food, and those fish may trade safety for a meal. The study was published June 29 in the journal Science Advances.
5 months ago

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'Safety in numbers' tactic keeps Pacific salmon safe from predators

A new study that leverages historical data has found unique support for a 'safety in numbers' strategy, where Pacific salmon living in larger groups have a lower risk of being eaten by predators. But for some salmon species, schooling comes at the cost of competition for food, and those fish may trade safety for a meal.

5 months ago·United States
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'Safety in numbers' tactic keeps Pacific salmon safe from predators

Animals that live in groups tend to be more protected from predators. That idea might be common sense, but it's difficult to test for some species, especially for wild populations of fish that live in the ocean.

5 months ago·United Kingdom
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‘Safety in numbers’ tactic keeps Pacific salmon safe from predators

A new University of Washington study that leverages historical data has found unique support for a

5 months ago·Charlottesville, United States
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‘Safety in numbers’ tactic keeps Pacific salmon safe from predators

A new University of Washington study that leverages historical data has found unique support for a “safety in numbers” hypothesis by showing that Pacific salmon in larger groups have lower risk of...

5 months ago
Read Full Article
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Bias Distribution

100% of the sources are Center
Science Daily
Phys.org
C 100%
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