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A unique catalyst paves the way for plastic upcycling

Summary by Ground News
Researchers led by Ames Laboratory developed the first processive inorganic catalyst to deconstruct polyolefin plastics into molecules that can be used to create more valuable products. The catalyst consists of platinum particles supported on a solid silica core and surrounded by a silica shell with uniform pores that provide access to catalytic sites.
1 month ago

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Science Daily

A unique catalyst paves the way for plastic upcycling

A recently developed catalyst for breaking down plastics continues to advance plastic upcycling processes. In 2020, scientists developed the first processive inorganic catalyst to deconstruct polyolefin plastics into molecules that can be used to create more valuable products. Now, the team has developed and validated a strategy to speed up the transformation without sacrificing desirable products.

1 month ago·United States
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Phys.org

A unique catalyst paves the way for plastic upcycling

A recently developed catalyst for breaking down plastics continues to advance plastic upcycling processes. In 2020, a team of researchers led by Ames Laboratory scientists developed the first processive inorganic catalyst to deconstruct polyolefin plastics into molecules that can be used to create more valuable products. Now, the team has developed and validated a strategy to speed up the transformation without sacrificing desirable products.

1 month ago·United Kingdom
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A Unique Catalyst Paves the Way for Plastic Upcycling

A recently developed catalyst for breaking down plastics continues to advance plastic upcycling processes. In 2020, a team of researchers led by Ames Laboratory

1 month ago·Charlottesville, United States
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